Tags: , , | Posted by Admin on 4/30/2010 10:23 AM | Comments (0)
Questions I was asked for Adwords Representative Interview Give me a runthrough of your resume? What do you know about Google? What do you know about Adwords? What do you understand about your job profile? How you fit into that role? Are you willing to give up the role of a team leader and creative writer to be an Adword Representative? How do you think this position can help your job profile? If Adwords was not associated with Google, would you have accepted the position? Yahoo and Microsoft has similar positions, why do you want to join Google only? You say you want a change in your career and use more of your skills, what other job profiles do you think would have suited you? What is your biggest failure in life? Have you been in a position when one of your colleagues did not do his share of work? How did you handle the situation? Suppose there is a project going on in full swing and two of your colleagues just fall sick, how will you handle the position? If you had to sell the job of Adwords Representative to a friend, what would you say to them? Tell me about a situation where just couldn't get along with one of your team members. What did you do? Have you ever faced a situation you didn't like at job? How did you face it? Do you have any questions to ask? Besides what HR sent you, what did you do to research about the position? What Google services you have used till date? Choose one of them and tell what change would you like to make in it? Your company generates revenue through Adsense. What kind of ads show up on your webpage? Why do you think Indian ads do not show up on your website's page? Do you know any of the Google terms and policies regarding Adwords? What did you liked about Google? Do you like the peole here? Which interviewer you liked the best? Why? Google has a flat system with not much vertical hierarchy system. It is based on meritocracy. If a person joins 6 months after you and becomes your mentor in a year, how would you handle the situation? Are you comfortable not having a vertical ladder to move on? At Google, you may have to deal with people who are freshers and ones who are much more qualified than you are. How will you balance out the situation and maintain relationships with all of them? You say you are flexible, adaptable and client-friendly. How? Give examples. What do you mean by people skills? That's all that I can remember for now.
Tags: , | Posted by Admin on 12/1/2008 10:41 AM | Comments (0)
I'm considering applying for the AdWords Account Associate position for Google, Singapore. I actually saw this position posted a while back (possible >2mth) as a friend (not a Googler) had recommended me to apply. Things at my current job were in overdrive at the time so I didn't apply. I'm pleased they're still hiring, but then I'm also wondering why it's still available. Though I suppose there's no harm to still apply eh? I know the Google website claims a "diverse working environment" with people from different backgrounds. But how open are they really to an applicant coming from a non-IT/Internet related background for the AdWords position? I have customer service/account servicing experience, coming from the hospitality industry (currently doing catering sales; no advertising sales experience). I'm very tech savvy/proficient though admittedly AdWords is one of the lesser used Google application for me. For AdWords positions, Google will send you an online worksheet to complete in 1 hour after one has passed their initial phone interview. It has you list reasons why pornography is ok to advertise and why tobacco products are not advertised by Google just in case you are asked by a Tobacco distributor to advertise for them (completely subjective). They will have you look at a list of email subject headings and ask you to identify which are important and which order you should respond to the important ones and the reasons why. They will also ask if you are ok handling pornography and its advertising. Their online worksheet test has both grammar and logic problems. The grammar problems can be easily bypassed by typing or pasting the questions in word to find the grammatical errors. They are highly secretive and I believe they interview engineers and other techies to simply get cheap R&D without any real intentions of hiring. Another questions I've been asked on this interview were: Give me a runthrough of your resume? What do you know about Google? What do you know about Adwords? What do you understand about your job profile? How you fit into that role? Are you willing to give up the role of a team leader and creative writer to be an Adword Representative? How do you think this position can help your job profile? If Adwords was not associated with Google, would you have accepted the position? Yahoo and Microsoft has similar positions, why do you want to join Google only? You say you want a change in your career and use more of your skills, what other job profiles do you think would have suited you? What is your biggest failure in life? Have you been in a position when one of your colleagues did not do his share of work? How did you handle the situation? Suppose there is a project going on in full swing and two of your colleagues just fall sick, how will you handle the position? If you had to sell the job of Adwords Representative to a friend, what would you say to them? Tell me about a situation where just couldn't get along with one of your team members. What did you do? Have you ever faced a situation you didn't like at job? How did you face it? Do you have any questions to ask? Besides what HR sent you, what did you do to research about the position? What Google services you have used till date? Choose one of them and tell what change would you like to make in it? Your company generates revenue through Adsense. What kind of ads show up on your webpage? Why do you think Indian ads do not show up on your website's page? Do you know any of the Google terms and policies regarding Adwords? What did you liked about Google? Do you like the peole here? Which interviewer you liked the best? Why? Google has a flat system with not much vertical hierarchy system. It is based on meritocracy. If a person joins 6 months after you and becomes your mentor in a year, how would you handle the situation? Are you comfortable not having a vertical ladder to move on? At Google, you may have to deal with people who are freshers and ones who are much more qualified than you are. How will you balance out the situation and maintain relationships with all of them? You say you are flexible, adaptable and client-friendly. How? Give examples. What do you mean by people skills? Prepare for the interview as you would for any other interview. Part of that process is knowing the company well, too, and there is a lot of information that Google placed online so you could know the company and their philosophies. That way, you'll know if you and Google are a good match, and also somewhat what they're looking for in your answers. Good luck!
Tags: , | Posted by Admin on 11/30/2008 9:32 AM | Comments (13)
Google's director of online sales and operations gives Google Watch some insight into the search and advertising company's hiring practices. Think you've got what it takes to work on Google's AdWords sales team? Well, be prepared to do some homework, because you won't get your foot in the Googleplex door without first completing the AdWords Worksheet. The worksheet, given to those who successfully pass a screening interview, helps Google judge a candidate's level of interest and preparation for an AdWords-related job. According to David Fisher, director of online sales and operations at Google, the worksheet helps the company in its goal to hire the best and the brightest people. "We believe our No. 1 advantage is our employees," Fisher said. "In our hiring process we look at a number of factors and ask candidates to do a number of things, like this [AdWords] worksheet. You have to know about AdWords and have an understanding of how it works." Think you've got what it takes? Try this problem, taken from an actual Google AdWords worksheet: Google�s policy is to not allow ads for tobacco products. An AdWords advertiser�s ad is reviewed and rejected for selling tobacco products.  The advertiser writes the following email response: Dear Google AdWords, I am outraged by your decision!  You allow pornography to be advertised on Google and not tobacco?  Your policy is hypocritical, and you are practicing discrimination. My products are legal, and I have been selling tobacco products online for years.  I demand you reconsider your decision and run my ad immediately! From, Jamie Young a.    Please discuss at least three reasons you believe Google would make the decision not to allow the advertisement of tobacco or tobacco products while allowing ads for pornography.  These might not be what you tell the advertiser, but rather internal reasons for this policy. b.   Below, draft an email response you would send to the advertiser The worksheet contains other problems as well, such as judging how well certain ads and keywords would perform and suggesting ways to improve ad performance. According to Fisher, Google has been using the AdWords Worksheet for much of the product's existence. The worksheet has changed over time as Google learns from the information that candidates give them. Once a candidate completes the worksheet, the company uses a qualitative and quantitative scoring method that judges the applicant's thoughtfulness, intelligence and ability to communicate difficult issues. "We're trying to look at your ability to think like an advertiser and give them info that's going to help them succeeed," Fisher said. Of course, Google gives different job candidates different worksheets or problems to solve. Engineers, for example, are asked to solve quantitative and logic problems, such as the blender prison and birthday bet scenarios. And successfully completing the AdWords Worksheet doesn't guarantee you'll get a job at Google. Candidates should expect a thorough interview process that may include multiple visits to Google's offices. For customer-facing jobs, Fisher said, the company looks at a lot of things you would expect: work and resume history; how candidates have performed at previous jobs; how they've progressed in their careers; the level of interest they show; and general aptitude. "We aim to to run a process that will help us hire the best employees we possibly can and create a good experience for the candidate," said Fisher. It's a fair but rigorous process, he said, and the company invests a lot of time and energy trying to make candidates feel comfortable, regardless of whether they're hired. "We want them to walk away feeling good either way," Fisher said.